Books

Grove Press
Grove Press
Grove Press

The Farrakhan Factor

African-American Writers on Leadership, Nationhood, and Minister Louis Farrakhan

by Amy Alexander

“Honest, unsparing and thorough in [its] discussion not only of Farrakhan, but also of the Nation of Islam, black nationalism and the state of race relations.” –The Boston Globe

  • Imprint Grove Paperback
  • Page Count 320
  • Publication Date January 25, 1999
  • ISBN-13 978-0-8021-3597-1
  • Dimensions 6" x 9"
  • US List Price $15.00

About The Book

The Nation of Islam’s Minister Louis Farrakhan is undeniably one of the most controversial and oft-maligned figures in American social and cultural politics. Now, for the first time, leading African-American voices speak out about Farrakhan, the myth and the reality, in the process reexamining and redefining notions of black nationalism, community, and African-American leadership. With contributions from such diverse and provocative writers as Gwendolyn Brooks, Stanley Crouch, Michael Eric Dyson, and Derrick Bell, The Farrakhan Factor gets past the headlines and sound bites to examine Farrakhan-and leadership-from within the black community. Combining sophisticated thought with active, personal engagement, The Farrakhan Factor is a superlative and eminently necessary document of American racial politics.

Praise

“Honest, unsparing and thorough in [its] discussion not only of Farrakhan, but also of the Nation of Islam, black nationalism and the state of race relations.” –The Boston Globe

“Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan is loathed and loved by millions, yet he is still an enigma to many. And most literary attempts to add insight have either been so biased against him or so fawning in favor that they have been worthless. Now maybe there is some light. . . . The Farrakhan Factor is a good and courageous start.” –Barbara Reynolds, syndicated columnist

“As the heir to Marcus Garvey and Malcolm X, Louis Farrakhan’s vernacular black nationalism is an important movement in our own time. The Farrakhan Factor helps us comprehend who he is and what he signifies.” –Richard Newman, W. E. B. DuBois Institute, Harvard University