Books

Canongate U.S.
Canongate U.S.
Canongate U.S.

The Mojo Collection

The Ultimate Music Companion

by Jim Irvin

“A gloriously celebratory guide to the history of pop . . . If your favourite album isn’t listed, it probably means you’ve got no taste.” —Independent

  • Imprint Canongate U.S.
  • Page Count 896
  • Publication Date March 01, 2008
  • ISBN-13 978-1-8476-7020-5
  • Dimensions 6" x 9"
  • US List Price $24.95

About The Book

Quite simply, the greatest albums of all time—and how they happened. The smartest, most keyed-in music critics from London’s best rock magazine provide opinionated, funny, insightful portraits of the best pop music records ever made.

Redesigned and updated to include the most recent releases, and with a new section of artists contributing their top-five albums of all time. Informative, gossipy, and wide ranging, The MOJO Collection is an essential purchase for those who love and live music.

Praise

“Virtually indispensable.” —MOJO

“A gloriously celebratory guide to the history of pop . . . If your favourite album isn’t listed, it probably means you’ve got no taste.” —Independent

“This is essential reading for anyone with a record collection.” —Buzz

Excerpt

On Dusty Springfield’s Dusty in Memphis:

In Memphis, Dusty’s painstaking way of working was at odds with Wexler’s, and she froze. Tension filled the air (as did a flying ashtray, at one point) in the absence of Dusty’s vocals. In fact she didn’t sing until she’d left Memphis, cutting the final vocals in Atlantic’s New York studios.

On Pavement’s Slanted and Enchanted:

Recording Slanted was our first stab at what we termed a “classic record,” Kannberg says. “This meant we actually practiced for a week before recording it.”

On NWA’s Straight Outta Compton:

From the opening, title-cut manifesto, through the “built to last” jam “Gangsta, Gangsta,” NWA delivered the goods from the front-lines with keen reporters’ eyes. . . . This was a record that begged to be heard at top volume. And that’s how it was in the summer of ’89 when it blazed from car stereos and boom boxes.