Books

Grove Press
Grove Press
Grove Press
NEW!

Leopoldstadt

by Tom Stoppard

Humane and heart-breaking, a passionate drama of love, family, and endurance

  • Imprint Grove Paperback
  • Page Count 112
  • Publication Date August 25, 2020
  • ISBN-13 978-0-8021-5771-3
  • Dimensions 5.5"" x 8.25""
  • US List Price $16.00
  • Imprint Grove Paperback
  • Publication Date August 25, 2020
  • ISBN-13 978-0-8021-5772-0
  • US List Price $16.00

At the beginning of the twentieth century, Leopoldstadt was the old, crowded Jewish quarter of Vienna, a city humming with artistic and intellectual excitement. Stoppard’s epic yet intimate drama centers on Hermann Merz, a manufacturer and baptized Jew married to Catholic Gretl, whose extended family convene at their fashionable apartment on Christmas Day in 1899. Yet by the time the play closes, Austria has passed through the convulsions of war, revolution, impoverishment, annexation by Nazi Germany, and the Holocaust, which stole the lives of 65,000 Austrian Jews alone. From one of today’s most acclaimed playwrights, Leopoldstadt is a human and heartbreaking drama of literary brilliance, historical verisimilitude, and powerful emotion.

Praise for Leopoldstadt:

“The fulfillment of a lifetime’s theatrical journey.”—Michael Billington, Guardian

“[Stoppard’s] most personal work ever, one which uses a slow excavation of his own Jewish history to create an epic family saga, examining—among many other themes—what it means to be Jewish . . . A summation of sorts.”—Sarah Crompton, Vogue

“Polished to a burnished sheen by the director Patrick Marber . . . Feels like an act of personal reckoning for its creator—with who he is and what he comes from . . . A group portrait, and one of uncommon density . . . Stoppard’s most topical play . . . Here, recollection is a laser, a tool to be focused on a past teeming with harsh and essential lessons for the present.”—Ben Brantley, New York Times (Critic’s Pick)

“The sprawling, windy drama, which is part epic and part essay, follows the trajectory of a couple of prosperous intermarried Viennese Jewish families from 1899 to 1955, but underneath the eventfulness of its surface is another equally poignant struggle—the spectacle of an 82-year-old playwright inhabiting a mishpachah of his own making, trying to reclaim by the power of imagination his disremembered history and his heart.”—John Lahr, Air Mail

“[Stoppard’s] most personal play yet.”Times (UK)

“The news that Tom Stoppard has written a new drama ranks as top-end seismic activity.”Telegraph