Books

Black Cat
Black Cat
Black Cat
NEW!

Miss Iceland

by Audur Ava Olafsdottir

The extraordinary new novel from Nordic Council Literature Prize-winning Auður Ava Ólafsdóttir, Miss Iceland tells the incisive story of Hekla, a brilliant young woman named after an active volcano who longs to make it as a writer in 1960s Iceland

  • Imprint Black Cat
  • Page Count 256
  • Publication Date June 16, 2020
  • ISBN-13 978-0-8021-4923-7
  • Dimensions 5.5" x 8.25"
  • US List Price $16.00
  • Imprint Black Cat
  • Publication Date June 16, 2020
  • ISBN-13 978-0-8021-4924-4
  • US List Price $16.00

Iceland in the 1960s. Hekla is a budding female novelist who was born in the remote district of Dalir. After packing her few belongings, including James Joyces’s Ulysses and a Remington typewriter, she heads for Reykjavik with a manuscript buried in her bags. There, she intends to become a writer. Sharing an apartment with her childhood and queer friend Jón John, Hekla comes to learn that she will have to stand alone in a small male dominated community that would rather see her win a pageant than be a professional artist. As the two friends find themselves increasingly on the outside, their bond shapes and strengthens them artistically in the most moving of ways.

Tags Literary

Praise for Miss Iceland:

Winner of the Icelandic Bookseller’s Prize

“Auður Ava Ólafsdóttir won the Nordic Council Literature Prize for Hotel Silence. Miss Iceland is likely to win her more accolades because this is her best work… a work that will live on.”—Kolbrún Bergþórsdóttir, Fréttablaðið

“Auður Ava Ólafsdóttir relishes us with all the best things literature can offer.”—Júlía Margrét Alexandersdóttir, Morgunblaðið

“Ólafsdóttir’s specialty is the small journeys we take to save ourselves and the ones we care for. She is the heart’s finest map-maker.”—Sjón

Praise for Auður Ava Ólafsdóttir:

“Olafsdottir’s writing is at once profoundly Icelandic—focusing the reader on all the particularity of life on that isolated island—and universal… Her authorial voice is immediate and intimate, yet it feels remote from the Anglophone world.”Financial Times

“Ólafsdóttir upends expectations.”New York Times