Books

Grove Press
Grove Press
Grove Press

The Mansion on Turtle Creek Cookbook

by Dean Fearing

“Fearing has adapted the spicy Indian-Mexican-Spanish influences of the region to fashionable nouvelle creations like lobster taco with yellow-tomato salsa and jicama salad. His intricate arrangements and subtle desert colors make his creations as intriguing to the eye as to the palate.” –Mimi Sheraton, Time

  • Imprint Grove Hardcover
  • Page Count 320
  • Publication Date November 01, 1987
  • ISBN-13 978-0-8021-1397-9
  • Dimensions 7.38" x 9.25"
  • US List Price $32.50

About The Book

Dean Fearing, named by Food and Wine magazine as one of America’s top ten young chefs, makes dining at Dallas’s The Mansion at Turtle Creek a truly extraordinary culinary experience. Chef Fearing’s sophisticated expertise with superlative food is highlighted in the elegant restaurant setting of this spectacular landmark hotel.

Now, in this luxurious full-color cookbook, Dean Fearing shares his imaginative, innovative approach to the foods and flavors of the American Southwest—an unusual, exciting, zesty cuisine that has earned him the highest praise from the most exacting diners in the world—in a cookbook as sophisticated, luxurious, and colorful as the meals he serves.

From his kitchen come unusual, appetizing starters like Warm Lobster Taco with Yellow Tomato Salsa and Jicama Salad, and his famous Tortilla Soup; a mouthwatering selection of original salads; and exquisite entr”es that make the most of the unique ingredients and exciting flavors of the Southwest. From Grilled Swordfish with Pineapple-Red Chili Salsa, to Fearing’s award-winning Oven-Baked Free Range Chicken with Maple Pecan Crust and Pan Sauce, to Texas “Broken Arrow” Venison with Spicy Golden Pear Sauce and Wild Rice Compote, these special dishes represent fine dining at its delicious best.

The Mansion on Turtle Creek Cookbook offers an eating experience that you must taste to believe—bold yet subtle in flavor, vividly appealing in presentation, and absolutely, utterly delicious.

Southwest Corn Chowder

Serves 6

• 6 large ears sweet corn
1 teaspoon corn oil
2 onions, cut into medium dice
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1 1/2 poblano chilies, seeded and chopped into medium dice
2 serrano chilies, seeded and chopped
3 cups chicken stock
2 cups heavy cream
Salt to taste
1 tablespoon lime juice, approximately
1 small baking potato, peeled and cut into medium dice
1/2 cup jicama, peeled and cut into medium dice
1/4 red bell pepper, seeded and membranes removed, cut into medium dice
1/4 yellow bell pepper, seeded and membranes removed, cut into medium dice
1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh cilantro

Shuck corn, remove silk, and cut kernels from cob. Set aside 3/4 cup.

Heat oil in a heavy saucepan over medium heat. Stir in remaining corn kernels and onions. Sauté for about 10 minutes or until onions are soft and juices have cooked down. Do not brown.

Add garlic, 1 chopped poblano, 1 chopped serrano chili, and chicken stock. Bring to a boil, stirring frequently Reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes.

Stir in cream. Return soup to a sim’mer and cook for about 5 minutes or until slightly reduced.

Remove from heat. Pour soup into a blender and blend until very smooth. Season to taste with salt and lime juice. Set aside and keep warm.

Fill a large pot three-quarters full with water. Bring to a boil. Season lightly with salt.

Add potato and cook for 2 minutes. Add reserved 3/4 cup corn kernels and cook for 2 minutes. Add jicama, bell peppers, and remaining diced poblano and serrano chilies; cook for 2 minutes.

Drain vegetables and immediately fold into warm soup. Pour equal por”tions into six warm soup bowls. Sprinkle an equal amount of chopped cilantro on each and serve immediately.

Advance Preparation: Entire soup may be made up to 1 day in advance. Reheat, but do not cook, just before serving.

Praise

“Ever since I first sampled Dean Fearing’s fascinating dishes at The Mansion on Turtle Creek, I looked forward to the day when his recipes might be collected in a book. In The Mansion on Turtle Creek Cookbook we now have the very best of Dean Fearing’s highly imaginative, sensible, mouth-watering dishes.” –James Villas, Town & Country

“Fearing has adapted the spicy Indian-Mexican-Spanish influences of the region to fashionable nouvelle creations like lobster taco with yellow-tomato salsa and jicama salad. His intricate arrangements and subtle desert colors make his creations as intriguing to the eye as to the palate.” –Mimi Sheraton, Time

“The recipes . . . work beautifully, taste great and look gorgeous.” –Laura Shapiro, Newsweek

“Surely the most aggressive modern recipe collection in Texas history.” –Alison Cook, Texas Monthly

“Chef Fearing’s professionalism and enthusiasm come through clearly. . . . Fearing manages to convey a sense of excitement about this complex style of cooking that won’t discourage the less skilled cook from giving it a try.” –Joan Klausner Caine, Seattle Weekly

“The book will serve as a keepsake for anyone who has ever partaken of the Mansion’s gastronomic splendors, and an inspiration to those of us who are less possessed by the art and science of the kitchen than Dean Fearing.” –Liz Logan, D Magazine

“Since the early ’80s, Fearing has been one of the innovators in what has come to be called Southwest cuisine, the style of cooking that swept Texas and then points East and West in the growing movement toward regional foods both in restaurants and home kitchens.” –Ron Ruggless, Dallas Times Herald

“Fearing is a daredevil at the helm of his smoker and grill and in his use of herbs and spices.” –Suzanne Winckler, Domain

“For anyone who’s interested in contemporary Texas cooking, this is the book of the year.” –Food & Wine