Tag Archives: Jean Genet

The Screens

“Only a true poet, a man possessed of verbally imagined artistry, could write such a play as The Screens. . . . [It] reveals…

Querelle

“Querelle is a sailor, assassin, dealer in opium, homosexual, thief, and traitor. . . . Genet takes seriously the threat latent in sexuality, and…

Our Lady of the Flowers

“Elegiac elegance, alternately muted, languorous, vituperative, tender, glamorous, bitchy, lush, mockingly feminine, “high camp,” overripe, vigorous, rigorous, exalted. . . . A remarkable achievement.”…

Miracle of the Rose

“Genet can use a brutal phraseology that makes prison life specific and immediate. Yet through his singular sensibility, these elements are transmuted into something…

The Maids & Deathwatch

“The absurdist style of Jean Genet’s The Maids, with its detours and mystifications, is taken over and consumed by its extraordinary perception of pain,…

Funeral Rites

“Funeral Rites is quite possibly an evil book. It is clearly a brilliant book, . . . a seminal document in the development of…

The Blacks

“Genet has strong claims to be considered the greatest living playwright. His plays constitute a body of work unmatched for poetic and theatrical power…

The Balcony

“One of France’s most original and forceful novelists and playwrights.” –The New York Times Book Review