Books

Atlantic Monthly Press
Atlantic Monthly Press
Atlantic Monthly Press

Night Train to Turkistan

Modern Adventures Along China's Ancient Silk Road

by Stuart Stevens

Night Train to Turkistan is one of the best of the [travel] genre yet to appear. . . . Stevens has a bright, nearly whimsical sensibility that can take inconvenience or discomfort and turn it into something to be enjoyed. . . . Stevens has a fine, as yet unjaundiced eye for the sudden, unexpected revelation that comes over the traveler. . . . With this book, Stevens has lived up to his own high expectations.” –Outside

  • Imprint Atlantic Monthly Press
  • Page Count 256
  • Publication Date May 01, 1988
  • ISBN-13 978-0-8711-3190-4
  • Dimensions 5.5" x 9"
  • US List Price $13.00

About The Book

“From the beginning, it was a silly idea. This, of course, I liked.”

So begins Night Train to Turkistan, Stuart Stevens’s irreverent, irresistible Chinese travel tale. In the late fall of 1986, Stevens, a young political consultant and writer, invited three friends to join him on an unlikely 5,000-mile quest along China’s Ancient Silk Road. Their goal was to retrace the steps of a famous journey made in 1936 by Peter Fleming, an eccentric British writer/traveler, who, like his brother Ian Fleming, had a flair for exceptional adventures.

Stevens’s choice of companions is more amusing than useful–a triathlete and closet good ole boy, a kung fu expert from Yale, and a six-foot-tall female rower in Lycra stretch gear. Only one of them–Mark Salzman, author of the acclaimed Iron & Silk–had ever been to China before and Salzman is profoundly unsure of he likes being back. Together this improbable foursome sets out from Beijing determined to follow Fleming’s route on the Silk Road to Kashgar, the fabled capital of Chinese Turkistan (or Tartary as it has been known for centuries) is one of the wildest, least populated regions on earth, dominated by the fierce Takla Makan desert, a name which translates into “you go in, but you do not come out.”

In the unbelievable cold of a Chinese winter, Stevens & Co. rumble across China in trains, donkey carts, bicycles, and some of the more memorable buses in recent literature. Often trapped in monolithic Russian-built hotels, they battle, bluff, and plead their way through the mazes of Chinese bureaucracy, surviving on such delicacies as lamb fat and cold noodles.

Crammed with unforgettable characters and unforgettably funny scenes, Night Train to Turkistan is a rare, high-spirited romp across a country where travelers are greeted with “Comrades, we welcome you to your journey. Please do not spit everywhere . . .”

Tags Asia/China

Praise

“Stevens’s Night Train to Turkistan is a winsome and well-written book and the perfect companion for anyone venturing forth into these inhospitable climes.” –Condé Nast Traveler

Night Train to Turkistan is one of the best of the [travel] genre yet to appear. . . . Stevens has a bright, nearly whimsical sensibility that can take inconvenience or discomfort and turn it into something to be enjoyed. . . . Stevens has a fine, as yet unjaundiced eye for the sudden, unexpected revelation that comes over the traveler. . . . With this book, Stevens has lived up to his own high expectations.” –Outside

“An intriguing and amusing account of a truly awful trip.” –Jane Sutton, Philadelphia Inquirer

“Stevens’ book makes delightful reading, full of humor and wit. Obviously influenced by A.J. Liebling, the great travel writer, Stevens utilizes the technique of relating the unfamiliar to the familiar. . . . Although Stevens maintains [his] humorous tone throughout, his observations are astute and his frequent allusions to other writers’ observations add up to an interesting, informative book.” –Carrington Tutwiler III, New Orleans Times-Picayune

“Stevens’ cheeky attitude . . . sets him apart and helps to make his account both irreverent and revealing.” –Booklist

“A wildly hilarious ride through an amazing, surreal land. The best travel book I’ve ever read.” –Beth Henley, Pulitzer Prize winning author of Crimes of the Heart