Books

Atlantic Monthly Press
Atlantic Monthly Press
Atlantic Monthly Press

The Face of War

by Martha Gellhorn

“A brilliant anti-war book that is as fresh as if written for this morning. Seldom can a correspondent assemble past writings from various locations and watch a clear pattern emerge, yet her pieces fall into place in a grand design. Her opinions, because they are rooted in these finely drawn scenes deserve to be read by many people.” –Herbert Mitgang, The New York Times

  • Imprint Atlantic Monthly Press
  • Page Count 352
  • Publication Date March 01, 1988
  • ISBN-13 978-0-8711-3211-6
  • Dimensions 5.5" x 8.25"
  • US List Price $18.00
  • Imprint Atlantic Monthly Press
  • Publication Date December 09, 2014
  • ISBN-13 978-0-8021-9116-8
  • US List Price $17.95

About The Book

Martha Gellhorn (1908-1998) was a war correspondent for nearly fifty years. From the Spanish Civil War in 1937 through the wars in Central America in the mid-eighties, her candid reports reflected her feelings for people no matter what their political ideologies, and the openness and vulnerability of her conscience. “I wrote very fast, as I had to,” she says, “afraid that I would forget the exact sound, smell, words, gestures, which were special to this moment and this place.” Whether in Java, Finland, the Middle East, or Vietnam, she used the same vigorous approach. Collected here together for the first time, The Face of War is what The New York Times called “a brilliant anti-war book.”

Tags Journalism

Praise

“A brilliant anti-war book that is as fresh as if written for this morning. Seldom can a correspondent assemble past writings from various locations and watch a clear pattern emerge, yet her pieces fall into place in a grand design. Her opinions, because they are rooted in these finely drawn scenes deserve to be read by many people.” –Herbert Mitgang, The New York Times

“Martha Gellhorn’s courageous, independent-minded reportage breaks through geopolitical abstractions and ideological propaganda to take the reader straight to the scene of the event. Whether she is covering the Spanish Civil War, World War II, the Eichmann trial, the Arab-Israeli conflict, Vietnam, Eastern Europe, or Central America, there is the same commitment to telling the truth as she has found it, the same sense of moral commitment to the value of human lives, the same fine indignation and passionate outrage at wrongdoing wherever she finds it.” –Merle Rubin, The Christian Science Monitor

“First-rate frontline journalism by a woman singularly unafraid of guns.” –Vanity Fair

“An eloquent, unforgettable history of a chaotic century.” –Jeffrey Rodgers, The San Francisco Chronicle

“Reading Martha Gellhorn for the first time is a staggering experience: How is it possible to have been so ignorant for so long of a writer who has written so passionately about so much–the terrible victory of Franco, the fall of Czechoslovakia, of Poland, the liberation of Paris from the Nazis, the brutality of the civil war in El Salvador? She is not a travel writer, or a journalist or a novelist: She is all of these, and one of the most eloquent witnesses of the twentieth century.” –Bill Buford, Granta

“A vivid, militant book by an intense and merciful writer.” –Edward Weeks, The Atlantic Monthly

“One of the best correspondents whom the War produced, and today her articles are as fresh as striped shirts returned from the wash.” –The New Statesman

“One great value of the book is that to the young who have not known war firsthand it will show the price paid in human misery when men seek to settle their disputes by force.” –Saturday Review

“Compelling . . . [Gellhorn’s essays] bear witness to horrifying atrocities, but they also delight with lyrical prose, touches of humor and a well-drawn thrill or two that the author experienced firsthand.” –Publishers Weekly

“The generous anger, the courage, the energy, and her wonderful voice as a writer: all this makes Gellhorn a national treasure and how she would hate such a label. No other woman has given us such a record of the brutal, and astonishing, events of this century. Once sent to cover a war I had only to read Gellhorn’s writing again to understand what should be done, what must be borne. She is heroic.” –Gloria Emerson