Books

Grove Press
Grove Press
Grove Press

Dead Folks

A Detective Sergeant Mulheisen Mystery

by Jon A. Jackson

“An episode of The Fugitive written by a clever if slightly disheveled Elmore Leonard.” –The Washington Post

  • Imprint Grove Paperback
  • Page Count 272
  • Publication Date March 12, 1999
  • ISBN-13 978-0-8021-3602-2
  • Dimensions 5.5" x 8.25"
  • US List Price $12.00
  • Imprint Grove Paperback
  • Publication Date December 09, 2014
  • ISBN-13 978-0-8021-9122-9

About The Book

Jon A. Jackson’s novels about Detroit Detective Sergeant “Fang” Mulheisen have been acclaimed as “addictive” by the Chicago Tribune. Now in Dead Folks, Mulheisen finds himself on the trail of his long-time archenemy, Joe Service. Joe, just out of a coma and on the run from a mob hit in the company of a beguiling nurse, finds himself in Salt Lake City, struggling to regain his memory and the millions of dollars heisted by his longtime lover, Helen Sedlacek. Dead bodies begin to turn up around town and it’s up to Mulheisen to put together the puzzle pieces. His Expertise and instincts eventually put him on the trail to Joe Service and lead them both toward a climactic page-turning ending that readers will not soon forget.

Praise

“An episode of The Fugitive written by a clever if slightly disheveled Elmore Leonard.” –The Washington Post

“Jackson makes the hard-boiled form look as if he thought it up himself last week.” –Newsday

“The gravelly voice of this dark, droll chronicler of the Detroit underworld is bound to make itself heard. . . . Jackson always gets it right.” –The New York Times

“Perhaps the toughest, most darkly comic, consistently superior American procedural on the market . . . superb . . . Anyone who sits on the hard-boiled side of the aisle and hasn’t yet met Fang Mulheisen is in for a rare treat.” –Booklist

“Few color the police procedural with bluesy riffs–or make it jump–the way Jackson does.” –Detroit News

“If Elmore Leonard wrote a screenplay for David Lynch, the result might be a lot like this hardboiled, darkly humorous tale.” –People