Books

Grove Press
Grove Press
Grove Press

Hit on the House

A Detective Sergeant Mulheisen Mystery

by Jon A. Jackson

“The best-kept secret of hard-boiled crime fiction connoisseurs . . . The guns, the gore, the nitty and the gritty–Mr. Jackson always gets it right.” –The New York Times Book Review

  • Imprint Grove Paperback
  • Page Count 256
  • Publication Date August 15, 2000
  • ISBN-13 978-0-8021-3705-0
  • Dimensions 5.5" x 8.25"
  • US List Price $11.00
  • Imprint Grove Paperback
  • Publication Date December 09, 2014
  • ISBN-13 978-0-8021-9123-6

About The Book

Jon A. Jackson is one of crime fiction’s masters, and Hit on the House, acclaimed by Jim Harrison as “an unqualifiably brilliant novel,” is note-perfect and deeply satisfying. Hal Good, a contract killer, is hired to wax Big Side Sedlacek—a mob heavy who’s been on the take. Picked up as a possible witness, he switched ID with a drunk and walks out of jail before Mulheisen can question him. Soon other Mob higher-ups begin to meet bloody ends, and a girl from Mulheisen’s past turns up married to an abrasive computer entrepreneur with a suspicious number of friends in “the business.” Big Sid’s daughter Helen is looking for vengeance; and the Mob’s freelance “investigator” is beating Mulheisen to all of his leads. As the investigation gets ever more unwieldy the body count threatens to grow, while the millions of dollars skimmed by Big Sid and his unnamed partners stay missing.

Praise

“The best-kept secret of hard-boiled crime fiction connoisseurs . . . The guns, the gore, the nitty and the gritty–Mr. Jackson always gets it right.” –The New York Times Book Review

“The book transcends its roots in genre to become a document of the human heart. . . . It’s the kind of book that will have you sitting up late, maybe nursing a drink, wanting to call an old friend and, at the very least, thinking about things. Now, that’s entertainment.” –Chicago Tribune

“Lean and direct . . . [Jackson’s] dialogue is excellent.” –Mystery News

“[Hit on the House is] first-rate. . . . Few color the police procedural with bluesy riffs–or make it jump–the way Jackson does.” –Detroit News