Books

Grove Press
Grove Press
Grove Press

Manual of Zen Buddhism

by D.T. Suzuki

‘suzuli’s works on Zen Buddhism are among the best contributions to the knowledge of living Buddhism . . . We cannot be sufficiently grateful to the author, first for the fact of his having brought Zen closer to Western understanding, and secondly for the manner in which he has achieved the task.” –Carl Jung

  • Imprint Grove Paperback
  • Page Count 208
  • Publication Date May 01, 1969
  • ISBN-13 978-0-8021-3065-5
  • Dimensions 5.38" x 8.25"
  • US List Price $16.00
  • Imprint Grove Paperback
  • Publication Date December 01, 2007
  • ISBN-13 978-0-8021-9876-1
  • US List Price $14.00

About The Book

Here are the famous sutras, or sermons, of the Buddha, the gathas, or hymns, the intriguing philosophical puzzles known as koan, and the dharanis, or invocations to expel evil spirits. Included also are the recorded conversations of the great Buddhist monks—intimate dialogues on the subjects of momentous importance. In addition to the written selections, all of them translated by Dr. Suzuki, there are reproductions of many Buddhist drawings and paintings, including religious statues found in Zen temples, each with an explanation of its significance, and the great series of allegorical paintings “The Ten Oxherding Pictures.”

Praise

‘suzuli’s works on Zen Buddhism are among the best contributions to the knowledge of living Buddhism . . . We cannot be sufficiently grateful to the author, first for the fact of his having brought Zen closer to Western understanding, and secondly for the manner in which he has achieved the task.” –Carl Jung

Excerpt

I. GATHAS AND PRAYERS

Gatha is a Sanskrit term meaning ‘verse” or “hymn”. In Buddhist literature it is used to designate the versified portion of the sutras. Chinese scholars have adopted this word for their versified compositions, which are known as chieh, an abbreviation of chieh-t”o, or as chieh-sang, which is the combination of the Sanskrit and the Chinese. The gathas collected here are not exclusively those of the Zen sect; some belong to general Buddhism.


GATHAS AND PRAYERS

ION OPENING THE SUTRA

The Dharma incomparably profound and exquisite
Is rarely met with, even in hundreds of thousands of millions of kalpas;
We are now permitted to see it, to listen to it, to accept and hold it;
May we truly understand the meaning of the Tathagata’s words!

II CONFESSION

All the evil karma ever committed by me since of old,
On account of greed, anger, and folly, which have no beginning,
Born of my body, mouth, and thought–
I now make full open confession of it.


III THE THREEFOLD REFUGE

I take refuge in the Buddha;
I take refuge in the Dharma;
I take refuge in the Sangha.
I take refuge in the Buddha, the incomparably honoured one;
I take refuge in the Dharma, honourable for its purity;
I take refuge in the Sangha, honourable for its harmonious life.
I have finished taking refuge in the Buddha;
I have finished taking refuge in the Dharma;
I have finished taking refuge in the Sangha.

IV THE FOUR GREAT VOWS[1]

However innumerable beings are, I vow to save them;
However inexhaustible the passions are, I vow to extinguish them;
However immeasurable the Dharmas are, I vow to master them;
However incomparable the Buddha-truth is, I vow to attain it.

V THE WORSHIPPING OF THE SARIRA

We prostrate ourselves in all humbleness before the holy Sarira representing the body of Sakyamuni, the Tathagata, who is perfectly endowed with all the virtues, who has the Dharmakaya as the ground of his being, and Dharmadhatu as the stupa dedicated to him. To him we pay our respect with due deference. Manifesting himself in a bodily form for our sakes, the Buddha enters into us and makes us enter into him. His power being added to us, we attain Enlightenment; and [again] dependent on the Buddha’s miraculous power, all beings are benefited, become desirous for Enlightenment, discipline themselves in the life of the Bodhisattva, and equally enter into perfect quietude where prevails infinite wisdom of absolute identity. We now prostrate ourselves before him.

VI THE TEACHING OF THE SEVEN BUDDHAS

Not to commit evils,
But to do all that is good,
And to keep one’s thought pure–
This is the teaching of all the Buddhas.

VII THE GATHA OF IMPERMANENCE[1]

All composite things are impermanent,
They are subject to birth and death;
Put an end to birth and death,
And there is a blissful tranquillity.


VIII THE YEMMEI KWANNON TEN-CLAUSE SUTRA[1]

[Adoration to] Kwanzeon!
Adoration to the Buddha!
To the Buddha we are related
In terms of cause and effect.
Depending on the Buddha, the Dharma, and the Sangha,
[Nirvana is possible which is] eternal, ever-blessed, autonomous, and free from defilements.
Every morning our thoughts are on Kwanzeon,
Every evening our thoughts are on Kwanzeon.
Every thought issues from the Mind,
Every thought is not separated from the Mind.

IX PRAYER ON THE OCCASION OF FEEDING THE HUNGRY GHOSTS

If one wishes to know all the Buddhas of the past, present, and future, one should contemplate the nature of this Dharmadhatu essentially as the creation of Absolute Mind.
Adoration to the Buddhas in the ten quarters;
Adoration to the Dharma pervading the ten quarters;
Adoration to the Sangha in the ten quarters;
Adoration to Sakyamuni the Buddha who is our Master;
Adoration to Kwanzeon the Bodhisattva, who is the great compassionate and pitying one, ready to save beings from afflictions;
Adoration to Ananda the Arhat who is the expounder of the Teaching.
Namu sabo totogyato boryakite, yen!
Sammola sammola, un!
Namu suryoboya totogyatoya tojito, yen!
Suryo suryo boya suryo boya suryo, somoko!
Namu samanda motonan, ban I[1]
Adoration to Hoshin[2] the Tathagata;
Adoration to Taho[3] the Tathagata;
Adoration to Myoshishin[4] the Tathagata;
Adoration to Kohashin[5] the Tathagata;
Adoration to Rifui[6] the Tathagata;
Adoration to Kanroo[7] the Tathagata;
Adoration to Omito[8] the Tathagata.
Namu omitoboya totogyatoya,
Toniyato,
Omiritsubomi,
Omirito,
Shitabomi,
Omirito bigyaratei,
Omirito bigyarato gyamini,
Gyagyano shitogyari,
Somoko.[1]

By the supernatural power of this Dharani the food and drink is purified, and this we offer to the spiritual beings as numerous as the sands of the Ganga. We pray that they shall all be fully satisfied and abandon their greed; that they shall all leave their abodes of darkness and be born in the blissful paths of existence; and further that taking refuge in the Triple Treasure they shall awaken the desire for supreme enlightenment and finally come to the realization of it. The merit they thus attain is inexhaustible and will continue on to the end of time, making all beings equally share in this Dharma-food.

O you hosts of spiritual beings, we make this offering of food to you all, which we pray will fill the ten quarters and that all beings of your kind will partake of it.

By the practice of this meritorious deed we pray that we repay what we owe to our parents, who have done all they could for our sakes. May those who are still alive continue to enjoy their happy and prosperous lives for ever, while those who are no more with us be released from suffering and born in the land of bliss.

We pray that all sentient beings in the triple world who are recipients of the fourfold benefaction, together with those beings suffering in the three evil paths of existence and tormented with the eight kinds of calamities, may repent of all their sins and be cleansed of all their sores, so that they may all be released from the cycle of transmigration and be born in the land of purity.

We pray to all the Buddhas, all the Bodhisattva-Mahasattvas in the ten quarters, of the past, present, and future, and to Mahaprajna-paramita, that by virtue of this merit universally prevailing, not only we but all beings shall equally attain Buddhahood.


X GENERAL PRAYER[1]

By the Bhikshus all present here
The mystic formula of Surangama has been recited as above,

Which is now dedicated to all the Nagas and Devas who are protectors of the Dharma,

And also to all the holy assemblies of the spiritual beings who are guardians of this monastery and surrounding district.

May all beings in the three evil paths of existence variously suffering the eight kinds of disasters be thereby released from the afflictions!

May all beings in the triple world who are recipients of the fourfold benefaction thereby participate in the merit!

May the state continue in peaceful prosperity with all its warlike activities stopped!

May the wind blow in time, the rain fall seasonably, and the people live happily!

May the entire congregation sharing in the exercise cherish the higher aspirations
To go beyond the ten stages with a eap, and this without much difficulty!

May this monastery keep on its quiet life, free from disturbances.

And the patrons and devotees grow not only in faith but in wisdom and bliss!

[We pray this to] all the Buddhas and Bodhisattva-Mahasattvas in the ten quarters, of the past, present, and future, and to Mahaprajna-paramita!


XI PRAYER OF THE BELL

Would that the sound of the bell might go beyond our earth,

And be heard even by all the denizens of the darkness outside the Iron Mountains (cakravala)!

Would that, their organ of hearing becoming pure, beings might attain perfect interfusion [of all the senses],

So that every one of them might come finally to the realization of supreme enlightenment![1]